Cee’s Flower of the Day Photo Challenge: September 9, 2018

As always, I am fascinated with the blossoms of a Naga Linga tree in Amritapuri.

To learn more about the tree and to see the photos I took of it last year click here.

 

Flower of the Day

Cee’s Flower of the Day Photography Challenge: September 7, 2018

I love having an opportunity to share photos of flowers in Amritapuri. Thanks Cee!

 

September 7 Flower of the Day Challenge

Cee’s Photography: Flower of the Day- September 5, 2018

Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge caught my eye. That is a good challenge for me to participate in while I am staying in Amritapuri!

In the Greenbelt: Nodding Onion

It has been fun to see what the native plants we picked to put in our Greenbelt site become. I have loved watching the Nodding Onion grow. This week I noticed that some of the plants had flowered.

I wonder how big they will get.

I looked up nodding onion (allium cernuum) on wnps.org (Washington Native Plant Society) and learned that they are clumping plants that may grow 16-20 inches tall. WNPS says the plant normally flowers in May or June; Wikipedia says July or August. They will develop black seed heads that will last all winter. For more information about nodding onion click here and here.

Surviving Adversity

I had attempted to clear parts of the Greenbelt lot behind my house numerous times over the years, long before our current GreenFriends Greenbelt restoration project began. One day in March 2015, when Ramana and I were doing some clearing, we saw a glimpse of yellow among all of the invasive blackberry and ivy vines.

It seemed likely that the flowers were daffodils and I was determined to free them from their prison. I picked up my shears and headed towards them. Because of the uneven, sloped ground, and the invasive plants, I needed to create a path of twists and turns.

Once I arrived at my destination, I was gifted with some beautiful sights.

We  started the GreenFriends Greenbelt Restoration project in September of 2016. When I saw the daffodils coming up in March 2017, I put some bright blue ribbon around them to decrease the likelihood of them being trampled. (The pile to the right of the daffodils is cut bamboo stacked on a drying rack.)

It may be my imagination, but when I saw the daffodils this year (March 2018) it seemed to me that they were more beautiful than ever before and had a sense of lightness and freedom.

By the time the daffodils emerge in March 2019, their surroundings will be clear of debris. I believe I will always view these flowers with a sense of respect and honor. Like ferns, they have survived being covered with blackberry and ivy vines for thirty or more years and are a striking example of living through adversity and thriving.