Beauty in the Greenbelt: Pacific Ninebark

In April of 2017, I took a live stake workshop. The participants cut branches from a variety of shrubs, took them home and planted them in containers. The stakes rooted throughout the summer and early fall. In November of 2017, I planted the ones that had in our forest restoration site.

Three of the Pacific Ninebark stakes not only survived, they thrived. When I was walking through the restoration site today, I noticed that there were many buds on the shrub. One of the flowers had partially bloomed. I think it is SO beautiful.

There are many flowers like this one on the shrub. The photo below shows about a third of the plant’s flowers-to-be.

This shrub will be so beautiful when all of these buds open. At this point, it is still a fairly small plant. I can only imagine what it will look like years from now when it is fully grown.

Cee’s Flower of the Day Photography Challenge

Red Huckleberry Shrub Awakening

I love watching plants change from winter twigs to beautiful shrubs. One day last week this red huckleberry branch caught my eye.

March 29

Within a day’s time the branch had changed significantly.

March 30

And four days later this is what it looked like:

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April 5

This is a photo of the red huckleberry shrub taken on March 30.

March 30

And on April 5 it looked like this:

April 5
April 5

The exquisite intricacy of Nature is amazing.

[Note: I’ve been getting frustrated because I haven’t been able to get clear close up photos. I discovered it was because the iPhone camera was focusing on the background. When I hold my hand behind the item I want to photograph the item becomes clear immediately. So expect to see my hand a lot!]

FOTD

Oregon Grape Shrubs Awakening

We have so many Oregon Grape shrubs on the restoration site. Some of them north of the Hanford stairs were planted by Earth Corps 10-15 years ago. Some of the ones south of the stairs were planted by a neighborhood group 6-10 years ago. All of shrubs had been crushed by blackberry vines but thrived once they were freed from those invasive plants. We have also planted new Oregon Grape shrubs throughout the site.

Buds
Buds begin to open
Flowering
More and more flowers
More and more beauty

FOTD

Mystery in the Greenbelt: Followup

In the days after our January 21 forest restoration work party, some peculiar events occurred. I wrote about them in Mystery in the Greenbelt.

I don’t know where the mystery shovel or the mystery plant came from. The only clue was the blue and white checkered flagging tape that was hanging from one of the branches of the plant. We had put that tape on all of the trees, shrubs and ground covers we planted during the 2017-18 planting season. But I still haven’t found a hole or a missing plant.

At the time, I decided that since there was no rationale explanation for the mystery, I would accept a non-rational one. I concluded that the plant was sitting on the side of The Rack Zone because it was “supposed” to be the first plant we planted in that area.

[The Rack Zone is located in the foundation of a house that we believe burned down in the 50’s. We have put all the blackberry, ivy and bindweed vines plus all of the weed we have removed since early in 2017 on drying racks in that area. During the January 21 work party, we took apart all but three of the drying racks and spread the contents over the concrete foundation. Our plan has been to eventually use that space as a planting area. The first photo below shows The Rack Zone after we had spread most of the dried debris on January 21. We have continued to add dried debris to that area since then. The second photo shows one of those work parties.]

So I planted the mystery shrub in The Rack Zone. I didn’t know what kind of plant it was and I didn’t know if it was alive.

When most of the plants on the site began to bud this year and that one didn’t, I thought it was probably dead. Then on March 18th some tiny buds appeared!

When I looked at the shrub again on March 21, there were leaves.

It was beginning to look like the shrub was an Oceanspray plant. In the days that followed, leaves emerged from all over the plant.

March 29
March 29

We now have a plant in The Rack Zone and it IS Oceanspray. I am eager to discover how it reacts to being in that environment. I hope one day it looks like this Oceanspray shrub I saw last summer.

FOTD

An Added Bonus

I spend so much time working in the Greenbelt that I often don’t notice what is going on in my own yard.

Two days ago, I realized my camellia shrub had started blooming, and the flowers were beautiful.

When I knelt down to take a photo of a bloom towards the bottom of the bush…

… I saw that there was something partially buried in the ground. I pulled it out.

Where did the shoe come from and when? It certainly didn’t come from my house. I looked around and noticed that the bottom part of my neighbor’s rotten garage was in front of me.

An animal must have pulled the shoe from there at some point. Finding something so unusual in my yard felt like an added bonus. I now had a mini adventure to report on, in addition to sharing the beautiful flowers.

FOTD

Progress Report: Pearly Everlasting

When we received the new plants for our forest restoration project towards the end of October, the Pearly Everlasting shrubs looked like this:

The Pearly Everlasting plants are the ones with the white flowers.

And here they are in their new home:

November 15, 2018

In the last post I wrote about them, they were beginning to emerge from the ground. I was surprised as I had no idea this was how they would grow.

January 27, 2019

And now they look like this!

March 26, 2019

I look forward to seeing how they evolve from this stage to the way they looked when I first saw the shrub during a November 2017 workshop.

The Pearly Everlasting shrubs are the ones in the background that have white flowers.

FOTD

Life Wins!

Some of the native shrubs we were given to plant in the Greenbelt this past November were already dormant. Some were simply twigs that look dead. Some of the twigs were even broken. I didn’t have much hope for those, but when I walked through the restoration site yesterday I discovered that life was emerging even from the twigs that looked least likely to survive!

The hollow stalk is only 3/4 inches tall, if that.

Life is good. Life is amazing.

FOTD